I Hate The Moor Quote

The line “I am not what I appear to be,” spoken by Iago, is a quotation from the play Othello. It exhibits his deep desire to harm the character due to a personal quarrel between the two. When applied to real-life, on the other hand, this phrase suggests racism. Let’s start by looking at the reading. There are several things you should be aware of:

  • William Shakespeare wrote Othello, a tragedy. The play’s creation date is uncertain, but it is likely to have been written in the 17th century.
  • The tale is about two central characters, as you may have guessed. Othello is the protagonist, and Iago is the antagonist.
  • The hatred between these two individuals leads to the deaths of their closest relatives and Othello’s suicide.
  • The play is notable for its diverse themes, including love, hate, jealousy, revenge, betrayal, and racism. As a result of this, the narrative has remained popular and attracts significant interest from the public.

Let’s continue our analysis of Hamlet with the quotation from Act 1 Scene 3 of the tragedy:

I hate the Moor:

And it is thought abroad, that ‘twixt my sheets

He has done my office: I know not if’t be true;

But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,

Will do as if for surety.

Iago’s enmity for Othello stems from his ambition to push a younger man, Cassio, above him. Iago feels he is more deserving of the position since Cassio is a less seasoned soldier. So, in order to get back at Othello, Iago concocts rumors and lies about the protagonist.

The enemy of Othello tells him that Desdemona is having an affair with Cassio, and he goes mad. In reality, Desdemona was a devoted lover for many years and adored Othello. However, because of his trust in the tale, the man kills her as a result of it.

Overall, Iago is a liar and a jealous person. Instead of searching for an issue within himself, he chose to vocalize his rage by duping others. As a consequence, the play closes with many victims in its wake.

Iago: Thus do I ever make my fool my purse:

For I mine own gain’d knowledge should profane,

If I would time expend with such a snipe.

But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor:

And it is thought abroad, that ‘twixt my sheets

He has done my office: I know not if’t be true;

But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,

Will do as if for surety. He holds me well;

The better shall my purpose work on him.

This is the portion of the film in which Iago confesses that he holds a deep animosity toward Othello. In this speech, Iago discusses how he plans to utilize Roderigo to obtain what he desires. He then states, “But for my sport and profit. I despise the Moor.” This indicates that he has a dislike for Othello for leisure and personal gain.

The fourth line, according to Iago, refers to a rumor that has been spreading among Othello’s troops about him sleeping with Desdemona, whom he calls his “wife” already. He then claims that despite this being no proof and only a suspicion, he will obtain more knowledge in order to be certain. “He holds me well; The better shall my aim work on him.” This suggests that Othello trusts Iago and will make it easier for him to create a strategy against him.

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