IS-100.LEB: Introduction to the Incident Command System Answers

by Quizaza team | Last Updated: February 22, 2021

ICS 100.LE, Introduction to the Incident Command System for Law Enforcement, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher-level ICS training.  This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of ICS.  It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).  This course uses the same objectives and content as other ICS courses with law enforcement examples and exercises.

Note: IS-100.LEb is an updated version of the IS-100.LE course. If you have successfully completed IS-100.LE or 100.LEa, you may want to review the new version of the course. For credentialing purposes, the courses are equivalent.

Course Objectives:
At the completion of this course, you should be familiar with:

In addition, you will learn the steps you should take to be accountable for your actions during an incident.

 

What type of command creates a single ICS structure with a built-in process for an effective and responsible multijurisdictional or multiagency approach?

A. Multiple Command
B. Area Command
C. Mutual Command
D. Unified Command

 

Which General Staff position manages costs related to the incident, and provides accounting, procurement, time recording, and cost analyses?

A. Finance/Administration Section Chief
B. Logistics Section Chief
C. Planning Section Chief
D. Operations Section Chief

 

You are a Group Supervisor working in a Branch within the Operations Section. Who is your immediate supervisor?

A. Branch Executive Officer
B. Branch Chief
C. Branch Director
D. Branch Leader

 

Which Section is responsible for providing communication planning and resources?

A. Finance/Administration Section
B. Operations Section
C. Logistics Section
D. Planning Section

 

You are working on editing and assembling the Incident Action Plan for the next operational period. Where are you working?

A. Operations Section
B. Logistics Section
C. Planning Section
D. Finance/Administration Section

 

You are working at establishing a computer network and communications support for incident personnel. Where are you working?

A. Operations Section
B. Planning Section
C. Finance/Administration Section
D. Logistics Section

 

The major activities of the Logistics Section include:

A. Setting up and maintaining incident facilities.
B. Preparing and documenting Incident Action Plans.
C. Compensating for injury or damage to property.
D. Developing plans for demobilization of resources.

 

When implemented properly, Unified Command:

A. Requires the establishment of separate Operations Sections comprised of responders from each jurisdiction or agency.
B. Involves the development of multiple Incident Action Plans under the direction of each Incident Commander.
C. Is managed away from the incident scene at an Emergency Operations Center or other facility.
D. Enables agencies with different legal, geographic, and functional responsibilities to coordinate, plan, and interact effectively.

 

Which of the following Sections is responsible for providing medical services to incident personnel?

A. Finance/Administration Section
B. Operations Section
C. Planning Section
D. Logistics Section

 

My Section supports the incident response by overseeing contracting for needed supplies and services that are not already available. Who am I?

A. Operations Section Chief
B. Planning Section Chief
C. Logistics Section Chief
D. Finance/Administration Section Chief

 

The Incident Command depends on me to make sure that all incident personnel have the supplies, equipment, and support they need. Who am I?

A. Operations Section Chief
B. Planning Section Chief
C. Finance/Administration Section Chief
D. Logistics Section Chief

 

Which Section is responsible for ensuring that incident personnel have needed transportation, supplies, and equipment?

A. Finance/Administration Section
B. Operations Section
C. Logistics Section
D. Planning Section

 

Incident Commanders within the Unified Command do all of the following, EXCEPT:

A. Work together to establish resource ordering procedures.
B. Concur on the selection of the General Staff Section Chiefs.
C. Communicate to make joint decisions and speak as one voice.
D. Form multiple command structures if disagreements arise.

 

Which individual or entity is responsible for conducting long-range and/or contingency planning?

A. Incident Commander
B. Planning Section
C. Agency Executive
D. Logistics Section

 

Within the Operations Section, a Director supervises each:

A. Unit.
B. Group.
C. Branch.
D. Division.

 

Which Section Chief is responsible for ensuring that assigned incident personnel are fed and have communications, medical support, and transportation as needed to meet the operational objectives?

A. Finance/Administration Section Chief
B. Logistics Section Chief
C. Planning Section Chief
D. Operations Section Chief

 

You are arranging for medical examinations for incident response personnel. Where are you working?

A. Operations Section
B. Logistics Section
C. Finance/Administration Section
D. Planning Section

 

Which Section Chief is responsible for recording personnel time, maintaining vendor contracts, administering compensation and claims, and conducting overall cost analysis for the incident?

A. Operations Section Chief
B. Planning Section Chief
C. Finance/Administration Section Chief
D. Logistics Section Chief

 

The Finance/Administration Section may staff four Units:

Procurement Unit
Cost Unit
Compensation/Claims Unit
___________________________________________________

A. Documentation Unit
B. Medical Unit
C. Time Unit
D. Administration Unit

 

TRUE OR FALSE: Under a Unified Command, there are multiple Incident Commanders who work together to establish the incident objectives.

A. True
B. False

 

The major activities of the Finance/Administration Section include:

A. Setting up food services for responders.
B. Collecting and evaluating incident intelligence.
C. Maintaining documentation for reimbursements.
D. Developing plans for demobilization of resources.

 

What is the correct name of the ICS application used when there are multiple Incident Commanders, each representing a jurisdiction, agency, or department that has responsibility for some aspect of the incident?

A. Mutual Command
B. Unified Command
C. Area Command
D. Multiple Command

 

There is a need to organize Groups and Divisions to ensure appropriate levels of span of control. The Groups and Divisions can be organized into:

A. Units.
B. Companies.
C. Branches.
D. Regiments.

 

The Incident Commander depends on the Logistics Section Chief to:

A. Direct tactical activities to achieve the incident objectives.
B. Interface with representatives from assisting and coordinating agencies.
C. Provide facilities, services, and material support for the incident.
D. Develop the Incident Action Plan.

 

Which of the following Sections is responsible for providing communication planning and resources?

A. Finance/Administration Section
B. Logistics Section
C. Planning Section
D. Operations Section

 

Terms to Learn

The Incident Command System (ICS) is a standardized approach to incident management that:
a) Enables a coordinated response among various jurisdictions and agencies.
b) Establishes common processes for planning and managing resources.
c) Allows for the integration of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure.
NIMS is a consistent, nationwide, systematic approach that includes the following components:
1.Preparedness
2.Communications and Information Management
3.Resource Management
4.Command and Management
5.Ongoing Management and Maintenance
Within NIMS, preparedness focuses on the following elements:
a) planning;
b) procedures and protocols;
c) training and exercises;
d) personnel qualifications,
e) licensure, and certification; and
f) equipment certification.
Communications and Information Management component is based on the concepts of :
a) interoperability,
b) reliability,
c) scalability, and
d) portability,
c) as well as the resiliency and redundancy of communications and information systems.
NIMS defines standardized mechanisms and establishes the resource management process to :
a) identify requirements,
b) order and acquire,
c) mobilize,
d) track and report,
e )recover and demobilize,
f) reimburse, and
g) inventory resources
The Command and Management structure is based on three key organizational constructs:
1 ) the Incident Command System,
2 ) Multiagency Coordination Systems, and
3) Public Information.
Within the auspices of Ongoing Management and Maintenance, there are two components:
1 )the National Integration Center (NIC) and
2) Supporting Technologies
The NIMS Command and Management component facilitates incident management. This component includes the following elements:
1) Incident Command System,
2) Multiagency Coordination Systems, and
3) Public Information.
Weaknesses in incident management are often due to:
a) Lack of accountability, including unclear chains of command and supervision.
b) Poor communication, due to both inefficient uses of available communications systems and conflicting codes and terminology.
c) Lack of an orderly, systematic planning process.
d) No common, flexible, predesigned management structure that enabled commanders to delegate responsibilities and manage workloads efficiently.
e) No predefined methods to integrate interagency requirements into the management structure and planning process effectively.
Without ICS, incident responses typically :
a) Lack accountability, because of unclear chains of command and supervision.
b) Have poor communications, due to both inefficient uses of available communications systems and conflicting codes and terminology.
c) Use unsystematic planning processes and fail to reach objectives.
d) Are unable to efficiently integrate responders into standard organizational structures and roles.
ICS is based on decades of lessons learned. Using management best practices, ICS helps to ensure:
a) The safety of responders, community members, and others.
b) The achievement of response objectives.
c) The efficient use of resources.
The use of ICS is applicable to all hazards, including:
1) Natural Hazards: Disasters, such as fires, tornadoes, floods, ice storms, earthquakes, or epidemics.
2) Technological Hazards: Dam breaks, radiological or hazmat releases, power failures, or medical device defects.
3) Human-Caused Hazards: Criminal or terrorist acts, school violence, or other civil disturbances.
The ability to communicate within the ICS is absolutely critical. During an incident:
a) Communications should use common terms or clear text.
b) Do not use radio codes, agency-specific codes, acronyms, or jargon.
Chain of command is an orderly line of authority within the ranks of the incident management organization. Chain of command:
a) Allows an Incident Commander to direct and control the actions of all personnel under his or her supervision.
b) Avoids confusion by requiring that orders flow from supervisors.
Under unity of command, personnel:
a) Report to only one ICS supervisor.
b) Receive work assignments only from their ICS supervisors.
Transfer of command may take place when:
a) A more qualified Incident Commander arrives and assumes command.
b) A jurisdiction or agency is legally required to take command.
c) The incident changes in complexity.
Incident objectives are established based on the following priorities:
1.Life Safety
2.Incident Stabilization
3.Property Preservation
Every incident must have an Incident Action Plan (IAP) that:
a) Specifies the incident objectives.
b) States the activities to be completed.
c) Covers a specified timeframe, called an operational period.
d) May be oral or written—except for hazardous materials incidents, which require a written IAP.
The ICS organizational structure:
a) Develops in a top-down, modular fashion that is based on the size and complexity of the incident.
b) Is determined based on the incident objectives and resource requirements. Only those functions or positions necessary for a particular incident are filled.
c) Expands and contracts in a flexible manner. When needed, separate functional elements may be established.
d) Requires that each element have a person in charge.
Standard ICS facilities include the following:
a) Incident Command Post
b) Staging Area
c) Incident Base
d) Camp
e) Helibase
f) Helispot
Intelligence includes operational information that may come from a variety of different sources, such as:
a) Risk assessments.
b) Threats involving potential for violence.
c) Surveillance of disease outbreak.
d) Weather forecasts.
e) Structural plans and vulnerabilities.
In reference to Accountability, the following principles must be adhered to:
a) Check-In.
b) Incident Action
c) Unity of Command
d) Span of Control
e) Resource Tracking
There are five major management functions that are the foundation upon which an incident management organization develops.
1) Command
2) Operations
3) Planning
4) Logistics
5) Finance and Administration
In addition to having overall responsibility for managing the entire incident, the Incident Commander is specifically responsible for:
1) Ensuring overall incident safety.
2) Providing information services to internal and external stakeholders, such as disaster survivors, agency executives, and senior officials.
3) Establishing and maintaining liaison with other agencies participating in the incident.
A Deputy Incident Commander may be designated to:
1) Perform specific tasks as requested by the Incident Commander.
2) Perform the incident command function in a relief capacity.
3) Represent an assisting agency that shares jurisdiction
In ICS, the following personnel comprise the Command Staff:
1) Public Information Officer,
2) Safety Officer
3) Liaison Officer
The Operations Section Chief:
a) Develops and implements strategy and tactics to carry out the incident objectives.
b) Organizes, assigns, and supervises the tactical response resources.
Using standard ICS terminology, the two types of team configurations are:
a) Task Forces — A combination of mixed resources with common communications operating under the direct supervision of a Leader.
b) Strike Teams — Consist of all similar resources with common communications operating under the direct supervision of a Leader.
On a large, complex incident the Operations Section may become very large. Using the ICS principle of modular organization, the Operations Section may add the following elements to manage span of control:
1) Groups — Used to describe functional areas of operation.
2) Divisions — Used to divide an incident geographically
The major activities of the Planning Section may include:
a) Collecting, evaluating, and displaying incident intelligence and information.
b) Preparing and documenting Incident Action Plans.
c) Tracking resources assigned to the incident.
d) Maintaining incident documentation.
e) Developing plans for demobilization.
The Planning Section may include the following units:
a) Resources Unit
b) Situation Unit
c) Documentation Unit
d) Demobilization Unit
The Logistics Section is responsible for all services and support needs, including:
a) Ordering, obtaining, maintaining, and accounting for essential personnel, equipment, and supplies.
b) Providing communication planning and resources.
c) Setting up food services for responders.
d) Setting up and maintaining incident facilities.
e) Providing support transportation.
f) Providing medical services to incident personnel.
Within the Logistics Section, the following six primary Units may be established:
1) Supply Unit
2) Ground Support Unit
3) Facilities Unit
4) Food Unit
5) Communications Unit
6) Medical Unit
The Finance/Administration Section is responsible for:
a) Contract negotiation and monitoring.
b) Timekeeping.
c) Cost analysis.
d) Compensation for injury or damage to property.
e) Documentation for reimbursement (e.g., under mutual aid agreements and assistance agreements).
Within the Finance/Administration Section, the following four Units may be established:
1) Compensation/Claims Unit
2) Cost Unit
3) Procurement Unit
4) Time Unit
In a Unified Command, institutions and responding agencies blend into an integrated, unified team. A unified approach results in:
a) A shared understanding of priorities and restrictions.
b) A single set of incident objectives.
c) Collaborative strategies.
d) Improved internal and external information flow.
e) Less duplication of efforts.
f) Better resource utilization
The Incident Commanders within the Unified Command work together to establish resource ordering procedures that allow for:
a) Deployment of scarce resources to meet high-priority objectives.
b) Potential cost savings through agreements on cost sharing for essential services.
Coordination includes the activities that ensure that the onsite ICS organization receives the information, resources, and support needed to achieve the incident objectives. Coordination takes place in a number of entities and at all levels of government. Examples of coordination activities include:
a) Establishing policy based on interactions with agency executives, other agencies, and stakeholders.
b) Collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information to support the establishment of a common operating picture.
c) Establishing priorities among incidents.
d) Resolving critical resource issues.
e) Facilitating logistics support and resource tracking.
f) Synchronizing public information messages to ensure everyone is speaking with one voice.
An EOC is:
a) A physical location.
b) Staffed with personnel trained for and authorized to represent their agency/discipline.
c) Equipped with mechanisms for communicating with the incident site and obtaining resources and potential resources.
d) Managed through protocols.
e) Applicable at different levels of government.
Another coordination entity is the Joint Information Center (JIC). The JIC:
a) May be established to coordinate all incident-related public information activities.
b) Serves as the central point of contact for all news media. When possible, public information officials from all participating agencies should co-locate at the JIC.