Ancient Greek Values In The Odyssey

The Odyssey is one of the greatest epic poems written by the Greek poet Homer. It displays many important qualities that people valued in ancient Greece. Loyalty, hospitality, self-control, and family are some of the Greek values seen in The Odyssey.

Homer’s epic poem recounts the tale of Odysseus, king of Ithaca. After the Trojan War, he travels for ten years in an attempt to return home (Blumberg, n.d.). The Odyssey is a thrilling adventure with enticing and evil alternatives as well as arduous earned triumph. The epic poem was written hundreds of years ago. It still enthralls readers by depicting a hero and a compelling narrative that is surprisingly human.

The poem’s lines evoke sentiments and illustrate key Greek values that were unique to the culture. When Telemachus began to cry, he threw his arms around this wonder of a father, and the lines “he wept as he embraced this marvel of a father,” show how significant family was for Greeks. Loyalty was also highly regarded in ancient Greece.

Penelope, Odysseus’ wife, is loyalty personified. She refuses to accept that her husband is dead even after years of suitors trying to catch her attention and pleading for another affair. Despite the suitors’ efforts to win her attention and press for another relationship, Penelope is steadfast in her devotion.

The story emphasizes self-discipline as a virtue. The lotus fruit tempts Odysseus, not at all. His battles, on the other hand, are ready to eat anything. They lose their desire and enthusiasm to return home eventually.

Another characteristic of being a lady, according to Penelope, is hospitality. When the poor come to her asking for bread and shelter, she instructs her servants to look after them. “You’ll bathe him and anoint him in the morning light so that he may dine with Telemachus in the hall.” Penelope states.

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